The “business compromise email”  is what the FBI calls the “$5 billion scam,” but apparently an insurance company did not agree with an insured company that they had been the victim of a crime.

A federal court recently found that a crime policy afforded coverage for a $4.8 million wire transfer that an insured company was duped into making.  See Medidata Solutions, Inc. v. Federal Ins. Co., 15-CV-907 (SDNY July 21, 2017).   In this case, the thief took advantage of “real” facts, posing as the insured’s attorney for a corporate transaction.   More specifically, the insured was contemplating an acquisition and, as part of that process, the president instructed the finance department to be prepared, on an urgent basis, to assist with the transaction.  Continue Reading Court Holds Crime Policy Covers Business Compromise Email Loss


Decisions you make when founding and/or investing in an insurtech venture can dictate your regulatory obligations, tax liability, operational structure and, ultimately, profitability.

Here are five seemingly simple questions to ask when launching an insurtech venture (and do not miss question #3): Continue Reading Five Questions for Investors in Insurtech

In another example of increased restriction on the rights of non-U.S. Citizens, last week the Department of Homeland Security (“DHS”) published a policy memorandum limiting the privacy rights of immigrants and foreign nationals under the Federal Privacy Act of 1974.  This new guidance was issued to bring DHS policy in line with President Trump’s January 25 executive order.

The Privacy Act was established to govern the collection, maintenance, use and dissemination of personally-identifiable information maintained by federal agencies.  The Privacy Act, with specific exceptions, prohibits disclosure of such records without the consent of the individual.  It also provides individuals a means to access and amend their records.

Previous DHS guidance stated that such personally-identifiable information would be treated the same, regardless of citizenship.  However, consistent with the January 25 executive order, the new guidance provides that immigrants and nonimmigrant foreign nationals may not utilize these provisions and may only access their information through a request made pursuant to the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA).  Additionally, they may not request amendments of their records.  Furthermore, in connection with the new guidance, DHS stated that it permits the sharing of such information about immigrants and nonimmigrant foreign nationals from agency records with federal, state and local law enforcement.

In response to the current Administration’s “citizen-centric” policies, we are seeing an increased interest in applications for naturalization by U.S. Lawful Permanent Residents.

Originally posted in Mintz Levin’s Immigration Law Blog on May 2, 2017

Today’s Guest Post courtesy of Bill Kyrouz, Mintz Levin’s CISO:

Have you come to the conclusion that you need a Managed Security Services Provider (MSSP) to support your small to medium sized enterprise but don’t know where to start?

Delegating elements of your security operations can be a scary prospect.  An entire school of thought says “If you don’t do all of your information security in house, you aren’t doing it right.”  While I’m sympathetic to that thinking, and caution against completely outsourcing security, this post is intended to help those who seek outside assistance.

Let’s dig in: Continue Reading From the CISO Corner: Your Most Important Security Relationship

“Don’t make promises that you don’t intend to keep” is an admonishment received by every child and delivered by every parent. This pithy maxim is equally applicable to consent orders entered into with regulatory authorities. Indeed, Upromise’s failure to abide by it is costing the company $500,000 in the form of a civil penalty from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC). Continue Reading More Broken Privacy Promises from Upromise: Key Takeaways From Upromise’s Latest Settlement with the FTC

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”) goes into effect in a little over fourteen months and from a quick glance at our bullet points analysis you can see there is a lot to consider.  One crucial aspect you need to be thinking about now is how your organization collects and manages consents from individuals for processing their personal information.  Without a strong understanding of what valid consent means under the GDPR, before long you may find yourself holding valuable data that you are not able to process as you need to for your business.

To this end, the Information Commissioner’s Office (the “ICO”), the data protection authority for the UK, last week published a consultation draft of its GDPR consent guidance.  This is a practical resource meant to help organizations get to grips with the GDPR’s consent requirements and align their internal procedures and processing activities, as well as their customer-facing websites, marketing materials, and product infrastructure.   Although the UK ICO cannot speak for the other EU data protection authorities, they have a good track record of producing practical guidance set out in accessible language, which makes the ICO website a good first stop for US companies seeking to understand their obligations in the EU.  We encourage you to review this helpful resource and provide feedback to the ICO using their comment form by March 31.  We also offer this high-level snapshot of a few key points: Continue Reading It’s Not Too Early! ICO Guidance Regarding Consent Under GDPR

Last week, the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) disclosed a $5.5 million settlement with Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) for HIPAA violations affecting the protected health information (PHI) of 115,143 individuals. The Resolution Agreement, which can be found here, also contains a detailed corrective action plan (CAP).

The Florida-based health system reported to OCR that the PHI had been impermissibly accessed by MHS employees and impermissibly disclosed to affiliated physician office staff. The PHI consisted of names, dates of birth, and social security numbers.

According to OCR, the login credentials of a former employee of an affiliated physician’s office had been used to access the ePHI maintained by MHS on a daily basis without detection from April 2011 to April 2012, affecting 80,000 individuals. Although it had workforce access policies and procedures in place, MHS failed to implement procedures with respect to reviewing, modifying and/or terminating users’ right of access, as required by HIPAA. The health system also failed to regularly review records of information system activity for its applications that maintain electronic PHI and which are accessed by workforce users and users at affiliated physician practices. To make matters worse, the health system failed to review the audit information despite having identified this risk on several risk analyses conducted by MHS from 2007 to 2012.

“Access to ePHI must be provided only to authorized users, including affiliated physician office staff” said Robinsue Frohboese, Acting Director, HHS Office for Civil Rights. “Further, organizations must implement audit controls and review audit logs regularly. As this case shows, a lack of access controls and regular review of audit logs helps hackers or malevolent insiders to cover their electronic tracks, making it difficult for covered entities and business associates to not only recover from breaches, but to prevent them before they happen.”

While hacking incidents typically garner more media coverage, this case highlights the increasing threat posed by those inside a HIPAA-regulated organization. According to a Protenus report, nearly 60% of the breaches that occurred this past January involved insiders. Organizations would be well-served by reviewing recent OCR guidance on the importance of audit controls.

Originally posted in Mintz Levin’s Health Law Policy Matters

 

It’s that taxing time of the year.   Employees have received W-2 forms and the tax filing season has begun in earnest.  And, as night follows day, last year’s W-2 spear-phishing scam has returned.  The IRS and state tax authorities have issued a new alert  to HR and payroll departments to beware of phony emails intended to capture personal information of employees.   The emails generally appear to be from a senior executive (typically the CEO or CFO) to a company payroll office or HR employee and request a PDF or list of employee W-2 forms for the tax year.   Those forms contain all the information any cybercriminal needs to file a fraudulent tax return for a tax refund.   That scam cost the US taxpayer about $21 billon in 2016.  Over 70 companies fell victim to the 2016 scam and hundreds of thousands of employee records, including Social Security numbers, were compromised.

To refresh your memory, here are some of the details that may be contained in the emails:

  • Kindly send me the individual 2016 W-2 (PDF) and earnings summary of all W-2 of our company staff for a quick review.
  • Can you send me the updated list of employees with full details (Name, Social Security Number, Date of Birth, Home Address, Salary).
  • I want you to send me the list of W-2 copy of employees wage and tax statement for 2016, I need them in PDF file type, you can send it as an attachment. Kindly prepare the lists and email them to me asap.

We’ve already seen some activity on this front being reported from around the country.  These incidents not only create angst for employees, but they constitute data breaches reportable under state law because personal information has been exposed to an unauthorized (and unknown) individual and the risk of identity theft is high.   Last year’s incidents also resulted in class action lawsuits by employees against some of the victimized companies.

Employees Are Front Line of Defense

These emails look absolutely legitimate.  That is what makes them so effective.  The header of the email may look exactly as one would expect, mirroring the company fonts, duplicating automated signature blocks, and containing the actual email address of the spoofed executive in the “From:” line. Often, the return email address won’t even be visible until after the reply is sent unless the user specifically expands the address field. If you look carefully, it is likely that the domain name is a few characters “off” from the company’s legitimate domain name, such as substituting the number one (1) for the letter “l” or replacing a “.org” with a “.com”.   The more sophisticated attacks may utilize information obtained from LinkedIn® or social media designed to lull the target into a false sense of trust.

Awareness of these attacks and the problem is the key for employees.   

Train employees — particularly HR and payroll employees — who handle sensitive information to be wary of direct requests for personal information from company executives.   Send out samples of such emails and establish a campaign to raise employee consciousness.  A bit of skepticism goes a long way in protecting against this type of attack.  Confirmation of this type of request should be standard operating procedure, no matter who appears to have sent it.   Your company’s IT department should also be monitoring for phishing trends and remaining on the alert for suspicious outgoing activity, including large files or attachments.

Ask.  Since we have already seen reports of these attacks very early in this tax year, it is time to check in and insure that your company has not already fallen victim.   It’s important to respond quickly to reduce total damage to the organization, and most importantly, to your employees.  Affected individuals can protect themselves with certain forms filed with the IRS – but it’s only effective if they know soon enough.

 

The Mintz Levin Privacy team is here to help with employee training or preparing a plan to respond to an incident.

In the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision in Spokeo, Inc. v. Robins, 136 S. Ct. 1540 (2016), lower courts have begun to address whether alleged violations of statutes intended to protect privacy suffice, in the absence of any further alleged injury, to establish Article III standing.  In Matera v. Google Inc. No. 15-cv-04062-LHK (Sept. 23 2015) Judge Lucy Koh of the Northern District of California ruled that a complaint alleging violations of the federal Wiretap Act, 18 U.S.C. § 2511(a)(1), and the California Invasion of Privacy Act (“CIPA”), Cal. Penal Code § 631, without more, pleads sufficient injury to satisfy the requirements for Article III standing as set forth in Spokeo.  In so ruling, the court concluded that Spokeo did not overrule prior authority finding Article III standing to sue for Wiretap Act and CIPA violations.

Continue Reading Alleged Wiretap Act and CIPA Violations Held to Satisfy Spokeo Test for Standing in Latest Gmail Privacy Class Action

The FBI warned this summer that the “Business Email Compromise” (“BEC”) scam continues to grow, evolve, and target businesses of all sizes. As reported by the FBI in June, the scam had hit more than 22,000 victims for a combined dollar loss of greater than $3 billion – that’s billion with a B! And the latest evolution is even more threatening, potentially causing breaches of protected data.

What is the BEC scam? Why have so many been taken in? And how can you protect yourself?

The BEC scam is a smart, targeted scheme using emails that appear genuine, usually seeming to originate from within the victim’s company or from its suppliers/contractors.  For example, the company’s CFO may receive an email that seems to come from the CEO, urgently directing funds to be wired to a specified account for a seemingly legitimate purpose. Or the email may appear to come from a supplier or contractor and seek payment on an invoice that appears legitimate. If the company wires funds as directed, the funds are transferred offshore and become unrecoverable.

The scam has been highly effective because BEC emails mimic legitimate requests. The perpetrators research their victim to learn its protocols, its counterparties’ names, its payment methods, etc. They often use social engineering techniques (e.g., phishing emails requesting info) to learn details about the targeted business. The successful perpetrators learn which individuals are necessary to perform wire transfers and what protocols are used. They may learn when the CEO is traveling, so that an email from the CEO directing payment would not be questioned. The perpetrator may have hacked and used a valid email account for this purpose, or may have established an account with a similar domain name. Their level of sophistication has enabled the theft of billions of dollars.

Earlier this year, the FBI started receiving reports that this highly successfully scheme has evolved into a means to obtain confidential information, leading to data breaches. For example, an email request to the human resources department may prompt the disclosure of W-2 forms or other confidential, personally identifiable information (“PII”). The FBI reports that victims have fallen for this new data-theft BEC scenario, even if they were able to successfully identify and avoid the traditional BEC scam.

We all have learned (hopefully) not to click links in suspicious looking emails. But trusted emails receive less scrutiny. What steps can you take to avoid being hit?

  • If an email is directing payment by wire or seeks protected information, it merits special treatment.
  • TRAIN employees and establish clear protocols for wire transfers and data privacy.
  • Beware of sudden changes in business practices. Require secondary sign-off by company personnel when a change in payment method is requested.
  • Always verify requested changes via other channels. Don’t click “reply”. Instead, call the sender to verify; and use a trusted phone number, not a phone number appearing in the email. Or forward the email to the sender after typing a trusted email address, and seek confirmation.
  • Be suspicious of requests for urgent action or secrecy.
  • Create intrusion detection system rules that flag e-mails with extensions that are similar to company e-mail.
  • In addition, diligently maintain data and email security. Educate employees to be alert to social engineering situations, and to delete phishing emails. Establish two-factor authentication for email accounts.

If you have questions about how to train employees and avoid these phishing scams, contact a member of the Mintz Levin Privacy team.