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Jordan Cohen is an Associate in the Health Law Practice and is based in the firm’s New York office. He provides clients with advice and counsel relating to federal health care laws and regulations, including the Stark Law, the Anti-Kickback Law, the Anti-Markup Rule, and state health care laws and regulations. Jordan also counsels clients on compliance with HIPAA’s Privacy Rule and Security Rule, including new requirements under the HITECH Act and 2013 Omnibus Regulations.

Last week, the HHS Office for Civil Rights (OCR) disclosed a $5.5 million settlement with Memorial Healthcare Systems (MHS) for HIPAA violations affecting the protected health information (PHI) of 115,143 individuals. The Resolution Agreement, which can be found here, also contains a detailed corrective action plan (CAP).

The Florida-based health system reported to OCR that the PHI had been impermissibly accessed by MHS employees and impermissibly disclosed to affiliated physician office staff. The PHI consisted of names, dates of birth, and social security numbers.

According to OCR, the login credentials of a former employee of an affiliated physician’s office had been used to access the ePHI maintained by MHS on a daily basis without detection from April 2011 to April 2012, affecting 80,000 individuals. Although it had workforce access policies and procedures in place, MHS failed to implement procedures with respect to reviewing, modifying and/or terminating users’ right of access, as required by HIPAA. The health system also failed to regularly review records of information system activity for its applications that maintain electronic PHI and which are accessed by workforce users and users at affiliated physician practices. To make matters worse, the health system failed to review the audit information despite having identified this risk on several risk analyses conducted by MHS from 2007 to 2012.

“Access to ePHI must be provided only to authorized users, including affiliated physician office staff” said Robinsue Frohboese, Acting Director, HHS Office for Civil Rights. “Further, organizations must implement audit controls and review audit logs regularly. As this case shows, a lack of access controls and regular review of audit logs helps hackers or malevolent insiders to cover their electronic tracks, making it difficult for covered entities and business associates to not only recover from breaches, but to prevent them before they happen.”

While hacking incidents typically garner more media coverage, this case highlights the increasing threat posed by those inside a HIPAA-regulated organization. According to a Protenus report, nearly 60% of the breaches that occurred this past January involved insiders. Organizations would be well-served by reviewing recent OCR guidance on the importance of audit controls.

Originally posted in Mintz Levin’s Health Law Policy Matters

At long last, the Department of Health and Human Services Office for Civil Rights (OCR) has released a revamped audit protocol that now addresses the requirements of the 2013 Omnibus Final Rule. OCR will be using the audit protocol for its impending Phase 2 audits of covered entities and business associates, which are set to begin next month.

The protocol covers the following subject areas:

  • Privacy Rule requirements for (1) notice of privacy practices for PHI, (2) rights to request privacy protection for PHI, (3) access of individuals to PHI, (4) administrative requirements, (5) uses and disclosures of PHI, (6) amendment of PHI, and (7) accounting of disclosures.
  • Security Rule requirements for administrative, physical, and technical safeguards.
  • Breach Notification Rule requirements.

OCR has also released other materials that shed light on the logistics of the audit process, including a copy of the Audit Pre-Screening Questionnaire that it will use to collect demographic information about covered entities and business associates. OCR will use this information to create a pool of potential auditees.

Entities selected for audit will be required by OCR to identify and provide detailed information regarding their business associates.  The information collected by OCR will be used to help identify business associates for the Phase 2 audits. OCR has released a template with the information that covered entities will have to provide, including the business associate’s name, contact information, type of services, and website.

Covered entities and business associates should be working to ensure that they have the required compliance documents and materials ready, especially given OCR’s aggressive timetable: if selected for an audit, an auditee will have only 10 days to respond to OCR.

As we have discussed previously on this blog, the audit protocol is an excellent HIPAA compliance tool, especially for audit readiness assessment.  Unfortunately, the version of the tool on the OCR website can be unwieldy to use in practice.   In order to assist covered entities and business associates with their HIPAA compliance efforts, we have repackaged the audit protocol into a more user-friendly format that can be downloaded here.

 

Originally posted to Mintz Levin’s Health Law & Policy Matters Blog on 4/20/16

The HHS Office for Civil Rights (“OCR”) officially launched  the long-awaited (and dreaded) Phase 2 of the HIPAA Audits Program on March 21st. Covered Entities and Business Associates need to be prepared for these audits and be on the lookout for emails (check your spam filter!) from OCR that will begin the audit process.

Why Audits? Why Now?

The Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act of 2009 (“HITECH Act”) requires OCR to periodically audit both Covered Entities and Business Associates for compliance with the HIPAA Privacy, Security, and Breach Notification Rules. OCR conducted Phase 1 audits in 2011 and 2012. The Phase 1 audits only examined Covered Entities and the results were generally disappointing. Only 11% of the entities audited had no findings or observations and many findings related to Security Rule compliance. After many delays, OCR is now proceeding with Phase 2. Continue Reading Phase 2 HIPAA Audits Coming to You: Check Your Spam Filter!