The clock is ticking down to May 25, 2018 , the date that the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into effect.   The GDPR is likely to be a game-changer for US companies doing business with the European Union, and many are racing against the clock to figure out exactly what their compliance obligations are.

We are presenting an in-person seminar in three cities to help make sure your company is on the right course to GDPR compliance.

Join us in either Boston, New York or Washington, DC for a look at GDPR Essentials and GDPR Hot Topics.    Register here.

Mintz Levin is an approved CLE provider and this seminar is accredited in California and New York.   We are also approved by the International Association of Privacy Professionals for IAPP CPE credit.

Spoiler Alert: Behavioral advertising companies will find some bad news in the guidance.

The Article 29 Working Party (WP29) advisory group, which will soon become the more transparently-named (and very powerful) European Data Protection Board, is busy drafting and issuing guidance documents to help organizations understand how European data protection authorities will interpret various requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).  WP29 recently issued draft guidance relating to automated decision-making and profiling that will be critical for all organizations that conduct those activities. The draft guidance is open for comments until Nov. 28, 2017.  This post recaps some of the particularly interesting aspects of the draft guidance, which can be found in full here (scroll down to the items just above the “Adopted Guidelines” section).

But first, what counts as automated decision-making under the GDPR?  And what is “profiling”? Continue Reading Key GDPR Guidance on Behavioral Advertising, Profiling and Automated Decision-Making

EU laws concerning the transfer of employee personal data to the US are complex, and penalties for getting it wrong are set to increase dramatically when the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) goes into effect in May 2018. Whether you’re in-house counsel, a human resources professional, or a business owner, join us for a review of the current options for transferring personal data, including under Privacy Shield, and a preview of the new landscape under GDPR.

New York and California CLE credit available – register here – 

 

Many companies have started the potentially lengthy process of auditing their service provider contracts to make sure that they comply with the requirements of the General Data Protection Regulation, which comes into force on May 25, 2018.

Fortunately for those companies that are trying to kick-start their contract audit process, the UK Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is forging ahead with its promised series of guidance documents to help companies get ready for the GDPR. The latest addition is a draft guidance note on the GDPR’s requirements for contracts between data controllers (the folks who make decisions about what personal data will be processed, and for what purposes) and data processors (the folks who carry out processing activities on behalf of a data controller).

The requirement that there be a contract between data controllers and their data processors is not itself new.  Current EU data protection law requires data controllers to have contracts with data processors governing the security of the personal data held by the processor and requiring processor to process the personal data solely in accordance with the instructions of the controller.

But the contract requirements under the GDPR are much more expansive. Continue Reading Have you started auditing your contracts with your service providers that handle EU personal data?  UK Information Commissioner’s Office issues draft guidance for compliance with the GDPR’s contracting requirements.  

The European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”) goes into effect in a little over fourteen months and from a quick glance at our bullet points analysis you can see there is a lot to consider.  One crucial aspect you need to be thinking about now is how your organization collects and manages consents from individuals for processing their personal information.  Without a strong understanding of what valid consent means under the GDPR, before long you may find yourself holding valuable data that you are not able to process as you need to for your business.

To this end, the Information Commissioner’s Office (the “ICO”), the data protection authority for the UK, last week published a consultation draft of its GDPR consent guidance.  This is a practical resource meant to help organizations get to grips with the GDPR’s consent requirements and align their internal procedures and processing activities, as well as their customer-facing websites, marketing materials, and product infrastructure.   Although the UK ICO cannot speak for the other EU data protection authorities, they have a good track record of producing practical guidance set out in accessible language, which makes the ICO website a good first stop for US companies seeking to understand their obligations in the EU.  We encourage you to review this helpful resource and provide feedback to the ICO using their comment form by March 31.  We also offer this high-level snapshot of a few key points: Continue Reading It’s Not Too Early! ICO Guidance Regarding Consent Under GDPR

It’s likely that 2017 will see still more data breaches and hacking stories, and companies should be looking closely at cybersecurity as a risk management issue, and not as an IT issue (we’ve been saying that for years ….).

One of the issues for 2017 will continue to be global changes in data protection laws, and how US companies operating in a global environment prepare for compliance with competing regulations.

To that end, we continue our ongoing series of webinars on the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

The upcoming webinar, the fifth in our GDPR Series, will explore the ways in which the Regulation creates new avenues for data transfers, and narrows others. In particular, we will consider sector-specific Commission decisions, privacy seals/certifications, the exception for non-repetitive, limited transfers, and the outlook for BCRs and Model Clauses.

Registration is online here.

 

For the past few months, the Mintz Levin Privacy Webinar Series has focused on the upcoming EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) to help businesses understand the reach and scope of the GDPR and prepare for the potentially game-changing privacy regulation. The GDPR will affect how US businesses handle and process personal data originating in the EU and may require changes to business process.

This week, we’ll present a webinar examining the criteria that determines whether or not your organization needs to appoint a Data Protection Officer. We will discuss the role of the DPO, the significance of the “independence” requirement, and the qualifications required to hold the position. Make sure to join us for this important webinar!

Registration link is here.

 

For the next few months, the Mintz Levin Privacy Webinar Series is focusing on the upcoming EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) to help businesses understand the reach and scope of the GDPR and prepare for the potentially game-changing privacy regulation.   The GDPR will affect how US businesses handle and process personal data originating in the EU and may require changes to business process.

Next week, we’ll present a webinar focusing on the data security and accountability requirements of the GDPR, including reviews and documentation of internal policies and procedures and data impact assessments.   We will also take a look at the onerous breach notification requirements and recommend actions that companies can take in advance to mitigate the need for breach notification.

Make sure to join us for this important webinar!

Registration link is here.

 

As we’ve discussed previously, the GDPR significantly limits user consent as a basis for processing personal data.  One interesting question is whether the new rules on consent will kill free apps in Europe.  Free apps typically involve the offer of a service (the app) in exchange for access to personal data (whatever data the app siphons off from my phone, for example, per the terms of use that I probably didn’t bother reading).  Under the GDPR, that may not be a bargain that I, as a consumer, am allowed to make. Continue Reading Will free apps soon be dead in Europe?

The European Union Commission has issued a fact sheet on the new General Data Protection Regulation (final post-trilogue text available via Statewatch).  The Commission claims that the Regulation is good for individuals and good for business.  We’ll leave that to readers . . . and history . . . .to decide.

As regulations go, the GDPR is a page-turner, but if you don’t have time to read all 204 pages before the holidays, consider joining our webinar at 1 pm ET today. Registration is here.