As our readers know we maintain a summary of U.S. state data breach notification laws, which we refer to as the “Mintz Matrix.”   Our latest update is available here, and it should be part of your incident response “toolbox” and part of your planning.

 During 2016, amendments to breach notification laws in five states went into effect (California, Nebraska, Oregon, Rhode Island and Tennessee).  And by the end of last year, well over twenty states had introduced or were considering new regulations or amendments to their existing security breach laws.  We expect there to continue to be significant regulatory activity in the data security space during 2017.  As always, we will keep you abreast of changes and will release updated versions of our Mintz Matrix to keep pace with developments in the states.

We are keeping an eye out for signs of support for a national breach notification law.  So far, there does not appear to be much political motivation for undertaking this effort.  A key sticking point is anxiety among a number of states that a federal law would offer less protection than their existing state law.  This is a valid concern since a national standard will only alleviate the significant burden of complying with the present patchwork of state laws if it has broad pre-emptive effect.  Only time will tell if state and federal lawmakers can work together to develop a comprehensive nationwide regime for security breach notification and remediation.

In the meantime, we must keep tabs on the forty-seven states (along with the District of Columbia, Guam, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands) with their own security breach laws.  Here is what’s been happening since our previous update in the Fall:

 California

 California amended its security breach law in order to require disclosure to affected residents (and to the Attorney General if more than 500 Californians are affected) when encrypted personal data is acquired by an unauthorized person together with an encryption key or security credential that could render the personal data readable or useable.

We note also that former Congressman Xavier Becerra recently took over as Attorney General in California, replacing Kamala Harris who aggressively pursued regulation in the privacy arena during her tenure as AG and who now serves California as one of its U.S. Senators.  Given this change in leadership, it will be interesting to see if the state continues to be a leader in pushing for stringent data security and privacy measures at the state and federal level.

 Illinois

Last summer Illinois passed an amendment to its Personal Information Protection Act (“PIPA”) that significantly broadened protections for personal information and the obligations imposed on businesses that handle such data.  The amendment became effective on January 1, 2017 and made several key changes to PIPA:

  • Definition of Personal Information. PIPA’s definition of “personal information” has now been expanded to include medical information, health insurance information, and unique biometric data used for authentication purposes (examples cited in the statute are a fingerprint, retina or iris image, or unique physical representations or digital representations of biometric data). The amended definition also encompasses a user name or email address in combination with a password or security question and answer that would permit access to an online account when either the user name or email address, or password or security question and answer, are not encrypted or redacted.
  • Encryption Safe Harbor. While PIPA already provided a safe harbor for data collectors if data disclosed due to a security breach was fully encrypted or redacted, the amendment clarified that the safe harbor does not apply if the keys to unencrypt or unredact or otherwise read compromised encrypted or redacted data have also been acquired in connection with the security breach.
  • Nature of Notification. For security breaches involving a user name or email address in combination with a password or security question and answer, data collectors may now provide notice in electronic or other form to affected Illinois residents. Such notice must direct individuals to promptly change their user name or password and security question and answer, or to take other appropriate steps to protect all online accounts for which the affected resident uses the same user name or email address/password or security question and answer. The amended statute also provides an additional option for substitute notice when residents affected by a security breach are confined to one geographic area.
  • New Exemptions. The amendment added an exemption for data collectors who meet their obligations under applicable provisions of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (“HIPAA”) and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act (“HITECH”). Any data collector that provides notice of a security breach to the Secretary of Health and Human Services pursuant to its obligations under HITECH must also provide this notification to the Illinois Attorney General within five business days of notifying the Secretary. This exemption will primarily apply to certain entities operating in the healthcare space. The amended statute also deems financial institutions subject to applicable provisions of the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act in compliance with PIPA’s data security requirements.
  • Security Requirements. Beyond addressing breach notification, the amendment requires covered entities to implement and maintain reasonable security measures to protect records containing personal information of Illinois residents and to impose similar requirements on recipient parties when disclosing such personal information pursuant to a contract. The amended statute also requires state agencies to report security breaches affecting more than 250 Illinois residents to the Illinois Attorney General.

 Massachusetts

 For those information junkies out there!  The Office of Consumer Affairs and Business Regulation (the “OCABR”) in Massachusetts has created a public web-based archive of data breaches reported to the OCABR and the Massachusetts Attorney General since 2007.  The data breach notification archive is available at www.mass.gov/ocabr and includes information about which entity was breached, how many Massachusetts residents were affected, if the breach was electronic or involved paper, and the nature of remediation services offered to affected residents.

 It is always a good time to review your incident response plan and data privacy policies to bring everything in line with changes happening on the state level. 

 And now for the disclaimer: The Mintz Matrix is for informational purposes only and does not constitute legal advice or opinions regarding any specific facts relating to specific data breach incidents. You should seek the advice of the Mintz Levin privacy team or other experienced legal counsel when reviewing options and obligations in responding to a particular data security breach.

Make sure to get your February 2017 Mintz Matrix!  Available here for downloading and always linked through the blog’s right-hand navigation bar.

 

When hackers steal consumer data, injury to consumers is not a foregone conclusion.  This is particularly so where credit and debit card numbers are stolen.  Banks, not consumers, bear the cost of fraudulent charges.  Consumers’ credit ratings are unaffected by such charges, and stolen payment card numbers cannot be used to steal consumers’ identities.   As a result, it can be difficult for consumers in payment card data breach cases to prove damages or injury. Continue Reading Ruling Vacating Target Consumer Class Settlement Highlights The Problem Of Standing In Data Breach Cases

The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) is investigating whether Yahoo! should have reported the two massive data breaches it experienced earlier to investors, according to individuals with knowledge.  The SEC will probably question Yahoo as to why it took two years, until September of 2016, to disclose a 2014 data breach that Yahoo has said affected at least 500 million users.  The September 2016 disclosure came to light while Verizon Communications was in the process of acquiring Yahoo.  As of now, Yahoo has not confirmed publically the reason for the two year gap.  In December of 2016, Yahoo also disclosed that it had recently discovered a breach of around 1 billion Yahoo user accounts.  As Yahoo appears to have disclosed that breach near in time to discovery, commentators believe that it is less likely that the SEC will be less concerned with it.

After a company discovers that it has experienced an adverse cyber incidents, it faces a potentially Faustian choice: attempt to remediate the issue quietly and avoid reputational harm, or disclose it publically in a way that complies with SEC guidance, knowing that public knowledge could reduce public confidence in the company’s business and could even prove to be the impetus for additional litigation.

Part of the issue may be that while the SEC has various different mechanisms to compel publically traded companies to disclose relevant adverse cyber events, including its 2011 guidance, exactly what and when companies are required to disclose has been seen as vague.  Commentators have argued that companies may have a legitimate interest in delaying disclosure of significant adverse cyber incidents to give law enforcement and cyber security personnel a chance to investigate, and that disclosing too soon would hamper those efforts, putting affected individuals at more risk.

Even so, many see the two year gap period between Yahoo’s 2014 breach and its September 2016 disclosure as a potential vehicle for the SEC to clarify its guidance, due to the unusually long time period and large number of compromised accounts. As a result of its investigation, it is possible that the SEC could release further direction for companies as to what constitutes justifiable reasons for delaying disclosure, as well as acceptable periods of delay.  As cybersecurity is one of the SEC’s 2017 Examination Priorities, at a minimum, companies should expect the SEC to increase enforcement of its existing cybersecurity guidance and corresponding mechanisms.  Whatever the SEC decides during its investigation of Yahoo, implementing a comprehensive Cybersecurity Risk Management program will help keep companies out of this quagmire to begin with.

If you have any questions regarding compliance with SEC cyber incident guidance, please do not hesitate to contact the team at Mintz Levin.

An old saw defines insanity as doing the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result.  Wendy’s shareholders recently flouted that maxim by filing a derivative action this week against officers and directors of the fast-food chain seeking recovery on behalf of the corporation for damages arising from a data breach that affected over 1,000 franchise locations between October 2015 and June 2016.  Based on the results in prior data breach derivative actions, the prospects for the Wendy’s derivative claim appear dim.

Continue Reading The Definition of Insanity? Wendy’s Shareholders File Derivative Action Based on 2015-16 Data Breach

 

The Obama White House has grappled with cybersecurity more than any administration in history: China’s 2009 hack of Google, the 2015 Office of Personnel Management breach, and the recent investigation of Russian cyberattacks during the 2016 election, to name just a few examples. In the midst of the president-elect’s transition efforts, President Obama’s administration has published what it considers to be a blueprint for enhancing the cybersecurity capabilities of government institutions and our digital consumer society today and for years beyond Inauguration Day.   Continue Reading #MLWashingtonCyberWatch: White House Releases Cybersecurity Report Aimed at New Administration

Dismissal Of Home Depot Derivative Action Extends Shareholder Losing Streak

An attempt to impose liability on corporate officers and directors for data breach-related losses has once again failed.  On November 30, 2016, a federal judge in Atlanta issued a 30 page decision dismissing a shareholder derivative action arising out of the September 2014 theft of customer credit card data from point-of-sale terminals in Home Depot stores.  The dismissal of the Home Depot derivative action follows earlier dismissals of derivative actions arising from data breaches perpetrated against Wyndham and Target. Continue Reading A Failed Strategy: Another Derivative Action In A Data Breach Case Goes Down To Defeat

Even president-elect Donald Trump has been the victim of a data breach. Several times actually. The payment card system for his Trump Hotel Collection was infected by malware in May 2014 and 70,000 credit card numbers were compromised by the time the hack was discovered several months later.  The hotel chain paid a penalty to the State of New York for its handling of that incident.  The hotel chain also experienced at least two additional breaches during this past year affecting various properties. From a business perspective, Mr. Trump certainly understands the high costs of cybersecurity in dollars and distraction. But from the Oval Office, it is far less clear what the Trump Administration might do to secure our country’s digital infrastructure and prosecute cybercriminals. Equally uncertain are Mr. Trump’s views on privacy rights and how his presidency might affect federal protections for personal information and cross-border transfers of data. We do not have a crystal ball, but offer some thoughts. Continue Reading The Cyber President? What To Expect From the Trump Administration On Cybersecurity And Privacy

In its recent decision in Galaria v. Nationwide Mut. Ins. Co., no. 15-3386 (6th Cir. Sept. 12, 2016). Co., No. 15-3386 (6th Cir. Sept. 12, 2016), a divided Sixth Circuit panel held that plaintiffs had standing to assert claims arising from hackers’ alleged theft of data containing plaintiffs’ sensitive personal data, including dates of birth and Social Security numbers.  In so ruling, the court became the latest to hold that hackers’ targeted theft of personal identifying information (“PII”), standing alone, creates a substantial risk of harm that is sufficient to satisfy the concrete injury requirement for standing under Article III of the United States Constitution.

The lawsuit concerned a 2012 data breach in which hackers stole data that Nationwide collected for purposes of underwriting life insurance policies.  Plaintiffs were among those who received notice that hackers had stolen data containing the names, dates of birth, marital status, genders, occupations, employers, Social Security numbers and driver’s license numbers for individuals who had applied for insurance from Nationwide.  Criminals are increasingly targeting PII like that stolen here because it can be used to engage in fraudulent borrowing or to file false tax returns to obtain illegal refunds, making such data valuable on the black market.  However, as is true in many cases involving PII data breaches, plaintiffs did not allege that their PII had actually been misused.  Also, Nationwide offered a year of free credit monitoring and identity-theft protection insurance to individuals whose information has been stolen.  Based on those protections and plaintiffs’ failure to allege actual misuse of stolen data, the district court granted Nationwide’s motion to dismiss for lack of standing. Continue Reading Sixth Circuit Rules That Theft of PII from Insurance Company Results in Article III Standing

As has become typical in the data security space, there was quite a bit of activity in state legislatures over the previous year concerning data breach notification statutes.  Lawmakers are keenly aware of the high profile data breaches making headlines and the increasing concerns of constituents around identity theft and pervasive cybercrime.  In response, states are beefing up their data security statutes in order to provide greater protection for a broader range of data, to require notification to Attorneys General, and to speed up the timeline companies have to advise residents when their personal information has been compromised, to name a few steps. Please review our updated Mintz Matrix to make sure you understand the latest rules applicable to your business!

According to a recent summary published by the National Conference of State Legislatures, more than 25 states in 2016 have introduced or are currently considering security breach notification bills or resolutions.  While much legislation remains pending in statehouses across the country, statutory amendments passed in four states took effect over this past summer alone.  Here is a brief summary of significant amendments to data breach notification rules in Nebraska, Nevada, Rhode Island and Tennessee. Continue Reading Summer Round-Up: Four States Bolster Data Breach Notification Laws and More Changes on the Way

Last week the clothing retailer Eddie Bauer LLC issued a press release to announce that its point of sale (“POS”) system at retail stores was compromised by malware for more than six months earlier this year.  The communication provided few details but did specify that the malware allowed attackers to access payment card information related to purchases at Eddie Bauer’s more than 350 locations in the United States, Canada and other international markets from January 2 until July 17, 2016.  According to the company, its e-commerce website was not affected.

In an open letter posted online, Eddie Bauer’s CEO Mike Egeck explained that the company had conducted an investigation, involved third party experts and the FBI, and now is in the process of notifying customers and reviewing its IT systems to bolster security.  These are customary and important steps following a security breach to mitigate harm to customers, protect against future threats, and comply with state data breach notification laws.    Read on to find out more ….. Continue Reading Eddie Bauer Latest Victim of POS Malware Attack