Amid the flurry following former FBI Director James Comey’s firing last week, President Trump marked his 111th day in office on Thursday, May 11th by signing an executive order targeting national cybersecurity.

The long-awaited order is the first step in fulfilling Trump’s promise to address national cybersecurity concerns and it arrives as threats of international hacking and cyberattacks reach an all-time high. It establishes three overarching cybersecurity priorities for the United States: (1) protecting federal networks, (2) reinforcing critical IT infrastructure, and (3) protecting the American public in the online space. The full text of the executive order can be found here.

While the order includes few actionable items, it sets strict deadlines for government agencies to produce risk reports and recommendations for improving their data security practices, signifying an important call to action from the executive branch that places risk management at the forefront.

Modernizing & consolidating federal networks

Consolidating to the cloud will likely be the first major step toward overhauling the government’s administration-wide cybersecurity protocol. In a press briefing last Thursday, White House Homeland Security Advisor Tom Bossert addressed what he views as fractured, agency-specific IT security practices across the government, noting that “[if] we don’t move to shared services, we have 190 agencies all trying to develop their own defenses against advanced collection efforts.”

The move to modernize is an extension of similar efforts from the Obama administration to bolster cybersecurity, an area in which Bossert says the administration made “a lot of progress … [but] not enough.” In line with advancing these efforts, the executive order requires federal agencies to use the Framework for Improving Critical Infrastructure Cybersecurity developed in 2014 by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (“NIST”) to manage cybersecurity risk. Coincidentally, the Framework may be revised soon as the NIST recently closed a comment period on an updated draft that it circulated in January 2017, and per the executive order any successor document to the Framework will become the operative version to be used by government agencies. Separately, Rep. Will Hurd (R-TX), Chairman of the House Information Technology Subcommittee, recently reintroduced H.R. 2227, the “Modernizing Government Technology Act,” which secures more efficient funding for the modernization of federal IT infrastructure and is expected to hit the floor of the House of Representatives within the next couple of weeks.

Reinforcing critical infrastructure

The second prong of the executive order requires the Secretary of Homeland Security to prepare an audit of potential vulnerabilities across the country’s infrastructure systems – from financial and telecommunications systems to utilities including water and electricity. Improving transparency about the security gaps in these systems is crucial, especially as traditional data breaches are losing ground to more devastating Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) botnet attacks made possible by the growing Internet of Things, or “IoT” (see our blog post here for a discussion of the House’s efforts to address growing security concerns around the IoT).

Protecting the public online

Finally, President Trump’s executive order urges policies aimed at protecting U.S. citizens from domestic and foreign online threats. In addition to increasing the number of cybersecurity experts working with the White House, Bossert suggested that following through on such policies will require greater partnerships between the federal government and the private sector. Indeed, the government currently relies on technology from large, long-time vendors, many of which may not be prepared to grapple with the significant and evolving risks becoming apparent across the data security landscape. Independent technology startups are proving to be the heart of progress in new cybersecurity measures, and the government will need to cultivate solid relationships with these players if it wants to stay ahead in the cybersecurity arena.

President Trump’s executive order has received some criticism for its breadth, but overall has been commended by cybersecurity experts as a balanced step in the right direction. Time will tell whether the resulting policies will make a meaningful difference in the country’s ability to fend off attackers in the ever-evolving online battleground.

 

Last week, Snap Inc. (“Snap” or the “Company”) – the parent company of the wildly popular app Snapchat (“Snapchat” or the “App”) – became a publicly traded company on the New York Stock Exchange in the biggest tech IPO since Alibaba in 2014.  Priced at $17 per share, the Snap stock opened at $24 per share on Thursday morning and closed at $24.48 per share, bringing the Company’s market capitalization to approximately $28 billion. In today’s post, we’re taking a closer look at Snap’s S-1 filing (“Snap S-1”) with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) with a particular focus on the Company’s disclosures of risk factors associated with cybersecurity and privacy risks.  Continue Reading A Deep Dive into Privacy/Security Disclosures in Snap’s S-1

In an effort to combat the growing prevalence of large-scale corporate cyberattacks, the New York Department of Financial Services (“NYDFS”) is rolling out a revamped cybersecurity regulation for financial services companies to take effect TODAY (March 1, 2017). This ambitious regulation is broadly drafted and carries a heavy compliance burden intended to protect consumers and ensure the safety and soundness of New York State’s financial services industry.   Even if you are not directly in banking or insurance, read on to see how these regulations may affect your company. Continue Reading It’s March 1: The Cybersecurity Goal Post Has Been Moved

 

What does your TV-watching history say about you? According to a recent lawsuit against VIZIO, Inc., it might be more than you think! One of the world’s largest sellers of “smart” televisions has recently paid a $2.2 million settlement following charges by the Federal Trade Commission and the Office of the New Jersey Attorney General that it was unlawfully tracking and selling 11 million consumers’ viewing data. The resulting court order has important repercussions for both consumers and smart TV producers.  Continue Reading Who is Watching you Watch TV? If You Have VIZIO … Your TV Might Be Watching You

With Inauguration Day upon us, it’s time for a #MLWashingtonCyberWatch update.   President-elect Donald Trump has vocalized his support for the future of “cyber” throughout his campaign – but how will members of his cabinet act, or refuse to act, on his vision for that future?

During the past two weeks, the United States Senate has been holding confirmation hearings for Mr. Trump’s cabinet selections. Pointed questioning from senators has surfaced many issues of critical importance to the American people, among them the future of privacy and cybersecurity. The incoming administration will confront significant issues in these areas such as the use of back-door encryption, mass data collection and surveillance, and international cybersecurity threats. The nominees for Attorney General, Secretary of the Department of Homeland Security (“DHS”), and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency (“CIA”) were each questioned about how they will navigate these concerns as part of the Trump Administration. In this installment of #MLWashingtonCyberWatch we are discussing highlights from these hearings. Continue Reading #MLWashingtonCyberWatch: Nominees Discuss Future of Cybersecurity

The U.S. Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) has filed a lawsuit against device manufacturer D-Link for allegedly deceiving the marketplace about the security of its products and, in turn, unfairly placing customer privacy at risk.

Overview

Taiwan-based manufacturers D-Link Corporation and D-Link Systems, Inc. (collectively, “D-Link”) design a variety of home network devices, such as routers, IP cameras, and baby monitors. Devices such as these are susceptible to hacking when they are connected to each other and to the internet (in what is often referred to as the “Internet of Things” or “IoT”), and weak security measures therefore pose a significant security concern. Judging from D-Link’s advertisements for its products, the company is certainly aware of these risks. D-Link boasted that its routers are safe locked from hackers thanks to “Advanced Network Security,” its baby monitors and cameras assure a “Secure Connection” to protect the livestream view of a sleeping child, and promises of an “easy” and “safe” network appear repeatedly during the set up process for a D-Link device with an online interface. As the FTC explains in its lawsuit, claims like those made by D-Link are not only misleading but also dangerous.

Despite an apparent awareness of consumers’ cybersecurity concerns, the FTC alleges that D-Link neglected to build common security measures into the devices it sells. The allegations are startling: mobile app credentials were stored unsecured in plain text on consumer devices; a private company key code was accidentally made viewable online for six months; hard-coded login credentials in camera software left video feeds vulnerable to unauthorized viewers. And that’s just the beginning. More details are listed in the FTC’s complaint filed in a U.S. District Court in California on January 5, 2017. These lapses, and D-Link’s deceptive advertising, prompted the FTC to charge the company with a violation of Section 5(a) of the Federal Trade Commission Act, 15 U.S.C. §45.

As of January 10th, D-Link has denied the allegations outlined in the complaint and has retained the Cause of Action Institute as counsel to defend against the action.

The growing IoT problem

In recent years, the FTC has tried to keep pace with mounting concerns over the IoT industry by filing a handful of complaints focused on consumer protection. For example, it went after the company TRENDnet after the firm’s faulty software allowed hundreds of personal security cameras to be hacked. It also filed an action against computer parts manufacturer ASUS after its cloud services were compromised and the personal information of thousands of consumers was posted online. These isolated mistakes add up; when millions of unsecured and seemingly innocuous Wi-Fi-enabled devices join the global network, they can serve as a massive launchpad for crippling cyber-attacks like the one that overwhelmed internet traffic operator Dyn and shut down several major websites in October 2016. The efforts of the FTC are aimed at mitigating such attacks and encouraging technology developers to invest effort and resources in order to secure their IoT devices before they hit the marketplace.

Search for solutions

Both the FTC and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have released reports offering guidelines and technical standards for building reliable security into the framework of new systems and devices. As we wrote about recently, the Obama administration had also left the Trump administration an extensive report on cybersecurity recommendations. Achieving these standards will require a combination of regular agency enforcement and greater market demand for safe, secure devices. In the meantime, some digital vigilantes are working to stop cyber-attacks before they start. Netgear, for instance, has launched a “bug bounty program” offering cash rewards of $150-$15,000 for eager hackers to track and report security gaps in its devices, applications, and APIS. Indeed, incentivizing solutions rather than quietly overlooking mistakes, and searching for loopholes in our laws, will make a substantial difference in safeguarding the IoT landscape.

Google’s recent changes to its privacy policy are coming under fire from a complaint filed late last year with the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) that accuses the company of downplaying “transformational change” in its handling of user data.  #MLWashingtonCyberWatch will be keeping track of how the 2017 FTC addresses this complaint.

On June 28, 2016, Google notified its users of changes to its privacy policy that would “give you more control over the data Google collects and how it’s used, while allowing Google to show you more relevant ads.” However, a complaint submitted by advocacy groups Consumer Watchdog and Privacy Rights Clearinghouse on December 5th (the “Complaint”) alleges that not only are the changes themselves in violation of previous agreements between Google and the FTC as well as Section 5 of the Federal Trade Commission Act which prohibits unfair or deceptive acts or practices in or affecting commerce, but also that the announcement of these changes intentionally misled users who, in the words of the Complaint, “had no way to discern from the wording that Google was breaking from a nearly decade-old practice.” Continue Reading #MLWashingtonCyberWatch: 2017 FTC and Google Complaint