The U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in what may become one of the defining consumer privacy cases of our generation. The central question in Carpenter v. United States asks whether the government violates the Fourth Amendment by accessing an individual’s historical cell phone locations records without a warrant. The Court’s decision, expected by June 2018, could draw a more concrete legal line for what constitutes “reasonable search and seizure” when government agencies seek to gather potentially incriminating smartphone data from third-party communication providers. The outcome of the case may significantly reshape consumer expectations of electronic privacy, and even alter the disclosures companies across all sectors must make in their privacy policies.

Continue Reading Carpenter v. United States Privacy Case Pushes Supreme Court to Decide Fourth Amendment Protections of Cell Phone Metadata