General Data Protection Regulation

As the clock ticks down to May 25, 2018, when the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) becomes fully enforceable throughout the EU, the Internet and airwaves have become saturated with guidance for companies about what to expect and how to prepare for its new protections and restrictions.  However, we’ve seen little intelligence for companies and their litigation counsel in situations where electronically-stored information (“ESI”) containing “personal data” resides in the EU and is relevant to discovery requests in American civil litigation.

In many ways, the process and procedures relating to transfers of personal data to the U.S. under the GDPR are similar – and similarly burdensome – to those of the existing privacy regime.  However, the GDPR does introduce new transfer options and clarifies others.  It has also added record-keeping and compliance reporting requirements as well as hefty penalties for non-compliance.

Our GDPR e-discovery series will examine these new and clarified transfer options for ESI containing personal data.  We begin our series with a newly added transfer option – the Hail Mary pass of transfer options – contained in a GDPR provision permitting a one-time limited transfer where necessary to further a “compelling interest” of the transferring party.

Continue Reading Will the GDPR Ease Cross-Border Data Transfers for Purposes of E-Discovery?

We’ve discussed privacy compliance with regulations, legal requirements, etc. in the space since this blog’s inception.   “Privacy by design” – while not a new concept – is certainly enjoying a new spot in the sunshine thanks to the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”) (93 days and counting…) and its codification of “privacy by design and default” in Article 25.

Privacy can also be a key differentiator and a competitive advantage.  Read on for some points that can help drive your data privacy/data management program. Continue Reading How to Leverage Privacy as a Key Competitive Advantage

In case you had not heard, the European Union is replacing its current privacy laws with a new, comprehensive General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which takes effect May 25, 2018. The essential principles of the EU’s privacy laws are unchanged, but the new Regulation imposes many new obligations on many more entities – all backed up by fines modeled on European antitrust laws. US Life Sciences companies are likely to find that the GDPR applies to their use of personal information that originated in the EU. This post suggests some pragmatic steps companies can take to assess and begin to meet their GDPR obligations.   We’ll be presenting the next webinar in our GDPR series particularly targeted to life sciences and biotech companies and that will be coming up in March.  Watch this space for more information and registration.

Step 1 – Confirm that the GDPR Applies Continue Reading Practical GDPR Steps for US-Headquartered Life Sciences Companies